Janae Pierre

Janae Pierre

Host/Reporter



Janae Pierre is an award winning journalist from New Orleans, La. She is the station’s general assignment reporter and local host of NPR’s All Things Considered.

Pierre has worked and volunteered with several different media organizations, notably NPR affiliate WWNO, the New Orleans Tribune and WBOK. In her spare time, Pierre enjoys listening to old vinyl records (she loves that scratchy sound). Some of her favorite artists include Al Green, Gil Scott Heron and Dinah Washington.

Pierre earned an Edward Murrow award for "Hard News" in 2020. In 2019, she was recognized as “Best Large Market Radio Reporter” by the Alabama Broadcasters Association. Pierre was also listed on Radio Ink's 2017 “Future African American Leaders in Radio."

Birmingham City Schools Will Begin The Year Online

BCS joins a growing list of school districts, including Tuscaloosa, Montgomery and Huntsville, that will begin the school year with remote learning only.

UAB Researchers Create Culturally-Based Protocol For Palliative Care

Ronit Elk led the study for the new protocol, after noticing the lack of respect for cultural differences for the nation’s sickest minority patients.

Researcher Finds Emojis Still Lack Diversity

Its World Emoji Day, a day to celebrate those little characters that help us express ourselves online. Emojis have come a long way, but how inclusive are they?

Selma City Schools Will Begin The Year With Online Learning

Selma City Schools is the first district in the state to announce they’ll be completely virtual to start the academic year. Superintendent Avis Williams said the decision was based on coronavirus numbers plus concerns from teachers and parents.

Civil Rights Foot Soldiers Optimistic About Black Lives Matter Movement

The civil unrest in America today looks a lot like protests held in the 60s, when Black Americans fought for equal rights. Foot Soldiers of that time say it’s the same fight but they’re hopeful change will come.

Community Organizer: ‘Our Protests Are Not Peaceful’

Alabama Rally Against Injustice has held several demonstrations in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd. One of the group’s representatives says leading rallies week after week is emotionally draining, but necessary. The group plans to continue holding rallies until policing policies change.

Hundreds Gather In Birmingham To Celebrate Juneteenth

Cities across the state are celebrating Juneteenth, the end of slavery. In Birmingham, hundreds gathered at Kelly Ingram Park to commemorate the holiday.

Organizer: Efforts To Rename Edmund Pettus Bridge Must Be A Group Effort

A petition calling on Gov. Kay Ivey to rename Selma’s Edmund Pettus Bridge has more than 120,000 signatures. We spoke with the Democratic strategist who started the online campaign.

Privacy Concerns Decrease Amid Launch Of Tech Giants’ Contact Tracing App

Alabama is one of a few states getting ready to deploy a bluetooth-based contact tracing app created by tech giants Apple and Google.

George Floyd’s Killing Sparks Frustration Among Birmingham’s Black Lives Matter Group

The police killing of George Floyd in Minnesota has triggered many protesters in the Birmingham area who are still seeking justice for Emantic “E.J.” Bradford, a black man killed by Hoover police in 2018. We spoke with Eric Hall, a founding member of the Birmingham chapter of Black Lives Matter.

Historic Theatres Among Businesses Damaged During Violent Protest

Clean up is underway in downtown Birmingham after demonstrations turned violent and protestors damaged several businesses including the historic Alabama and Lyric theatres.

Birmingham Brewery Bounces Back After Coronavirus Slows Sales

We checked back in with a Birmingham brewery owner who wasn’t sure in mid-March whether his business would survive the pandemic.

Traditional Graduation Ceremonies Back On At Some High Schools

Hoover City Schools announced it will move forward with in-person graduation ceremonies this week, and they’re not alone. Parents are divided on the issue.

Some Restaurants Continue Curbside Service Despite Relaxed Restrictions

Gov. Kay Ivey’s updated “safer-at-home” order puts most of the hospitality industry back to work. Some business owners were quick to open their doors, but others are sticking with curbside service only.

Amid COVID-19 Pressures, Lucy’s Coffee & Tea Closes For Good

Lucy’s Coffee & Tea has been a Birmingham staple for more than 25 years. Earlier this week, owner Lucy Bonds announced she’s closing her cafe for good.

As Medical Procedures Resume, Patients Weigh Whether It’s Safe

Gov. Kay Ivey’s “safer-at-home” order allows doctors to resume elective medical and dental procedures. For some patients, that’s good news.

Some Alabama Graduations Saved By Going Virtual

Most spring graduations are canceled because of the coronavirus pandemic. But a few groups and institutions are organizing virtual ceremonies for the class of 2020

Customers Resort To DIY Styles With Barbershops & Hair Salons Closed

The coronavirus pandemic forced the closure of nonessential businesses, including hair salons and barbershops. That has led some people to get creative about how to keep their hair looking good during the crisis.

Birmingham Mayor Undecided On When To Reopen City Economy

Birmingham Mayor Randall Woodfin updated residents on the city’s fight against COVID-19.

UAB’s Pastoral Care Team Counsels Health Care Workers Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

Hospital chaplains usually show comfort to patients or their families, but at UAB that has changed. During the coronavirus pandemic, the pastoral care team spends a lot of time counseling health care workers who are on the front lines.

As Quarantine Spurs Demand, Some Companies Are Hiring

Many businesses have laid off workers as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, but plenty of companies in Alabama are hiring. While some companies grapple with worker safety concerns, it hasn’t stopped them from growing.

Coronavirus Impacts Revenue At Birmingham Zoo

Spring usually kicks off the busy season for the Birmingham Zoo, but not this year. Like many attractions across the nation, the zoo is closed until further notice because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Alabama Bankers Association CEO Says Banks Are Secure During Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has many people wondering about their economic future and the safety of their money. The head of the Alabama Bankers Association says banks across the state have been preparing for a crisis of this magnitude for years.

Birmingham’s Food & Beverage Industry Struggles Amid Coronavirus

Many small businesses in Alabama hit by the coronavirus crisis are struggling to stay afloat. State health officials recently prohibited on-site eating and drinking at restaurants and bars. The restrictions have forced a few Birmingham establishments to close their doors for good.

Alabama COVID-19 Testing Rife With Delays And Uncertainty

Across Alabama, the demand for COVID-19 testing is growing, and labs are struggling to turn around test results quickly.

Alabama Events Canceled, Attractions Close Amid Coronavirus Fears

The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted many closures and event cancellations across the state.

Yoga Still Being Taught To Some Students Despite 27-Year-Old Ban

Alabama is one step closer to overturning a decades-old ban on yoga in public schools. This week, the state House of Representatives voted in favor a bill that would give school systems the option to teach yoga with some restrictions. But Jimi Lee, head of Yoga & Love has led yoga at some schools, despite the ban. School leaders just call the practice by another name.

Jefferson County Department Of Health Prepared For Coronavirus

In a press conference, President Trump insisted the risk of Americans getting the coronavirus disease remains very low. But CDC officials say they expect COVID-19 to spread to more states across the U.S. and they’re preparing local health departments with specific guidelines for dealing with the disease.

Report Reveals Voter Access Difficult In Alabama

Super Tuesday is nearly a week away and hundreds-of-thousands of Alabama voters are expected to turn out. But according to a new report by the Southern Poverty Law Center, Alabama remains one of the most difficult states for an eligible voter to register and cast a ballot.

StoryCorps Founder Brings One Small Step Event to Birmingham

StoryCorps has provided people across the U.S. the opportunity to record and preserve the stories of their lives. Now, the organization is taking that idea to another level with One Small Step. StoryCorps’ founder, Dave Isay, shares more.

Smithsonian Educator Explores Ways to Teach Evolution in Alabama Schools

Briana Pobiner is a paleoanthropologist and educator at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History. She’s using a federal grant to explore the best ways to teach evolution in Alabama high schools; although some textbooks still contain warning stickers saying evolution is just a theory.

Small Fraction of Students Qualify for Birmingham Promise Scholarship

When it was announced recently that the Birmingham Promise would offer a full tuition scholarship to the University of Alabama at Birmingham, many praised the partnership as a way to give eligible Birmingham graduates a much-needed financial boost. But as it stands, most students wouldn’t make the cut.