Janae Pierre

Janae Pierre

Host/Reporter



Janae Pierre is an award winning journalist from New Orleans, La. She is the station’s general assignment reporter and local host of NPR’s All Things Considered.

Pierre has worked and volunteered with several different media organizations, notably NPR affiliate WWNO, the New Orleans Tribune and WBOK. In her spare time, Pierre enjoys listening to old vinyl records (she loves that scratchy sound). Some of her favorite artists include Al Green, Gil Scott Heron and Dinah Washington.

Pierre earned an Edward Murrow award for "Hard News" in 2020. In 2019, she was recognized as “Best Large Market Radio Reporter” by the Alabama Broadcasters Association. Pierre was also listed on Radio Ink's 2017 “Future African American Leaders in Radio."

State’s Proposed Gas Tax Bill Places Fees on Electric, Hybrid Car Owners

State lawmakers went into special session today to consider a proposed gas tax increase to fund road and bridge construction. The bill would impact all motorists — but some would pay significantly more than others.

Memorial Planned to Honor Jeffco Lynching Victims

Organizers of the Jefferson County Memorial Project will release findings today on 30 lynching victims in the county. That’s a small fraction of the thousands of African American lynchings that took place in the South. Now, the grassroots coalition wants to bring a lynching memorial to Birmingham as a remembrance.

Family of Emantic Bradford Jr. Renews Calls for Transparency

The family of a man killed by police in a Thanksgiving mall shooting wants authorities to release all video footage and the name of the officer involved.

U.S. Steel Revives Furnace Project in Fairfield

U.S. Steel Corporation will restart work on its electric arc furnace in Fairfield. The $215 million initiative will replace the former blast furnace at Fairfield Works.

Gaelynn Lea: Advocating for Disability Rights Through Music

Gaelynn Lea is a classically trained violinist who was born with brittle bone disease, a genetic disorder that results in very fragile bones. She shares more about her condition and how being a wheelchair user hasn’t stopped her from performing.

Jamie N Commons Makes Tour Stop in Birmingham

Singer-songwriter Jamie N Commons kicks off a tour of the South this weekend with headliner Jacob Banks. Commons is known for his creative blend of rock and soul. He talks about his influences and his upcoming performance in Birmingham.

ASO Director Reacts to Political Crisis in Venezuela

Venezuela’s political crisis is at a boiling point. There are food shortages, and dozens have died in recent violent protests. Carlos Izcaray, music director of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra, has seen Venezuela’s downward spiral firsthand and shares his experience.

UAB Police Chief Named President of National Accreditation Group

The Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, or CALEA, has chosen UAB Police Chief Anthony Purcell to lead the national organization. The commission sets hundreds of standards for law enforcement agencies on everything from body cam usage to bias training.

Organist Hired by MLK Still Plays at Historic Church

The Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. was pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church from 1954-1960. King hired an organist named Althea Thomas. More than 60 years later, Thomas still plays at the historic church.

Experts: Alabama’s Mask Law is Outdated

For almost 70 years it’s been illegal to wear a mask in public in Alabama, unless it’s Halloween or Mardi Gras. Some activists and experts say the state’s mask provision is unconstitutional.

ACLU and NAACP Request Policies on Police Use of Force

The ACLU of Alabama and Alabama NAACP filed public records requests with the Hoover police department and several others across the state. The organizations are looking for information on racial bias training, use of force and body camera policies.

Birmingham Poet Gives Voice to Enslaved Women

Dr. James Marion Sims, the man known as the father of modern gynecology, spent years performing surgery on women who experienced complications tied to difficult childbirth. This was in the 19th century at his makeshift hospital in Mt. Meigs, just outside of Montgomery. Sims, who is white, performed this experimental surgery on black enslaved women – without anesthesia. Birmingham author Kwoya Fagin Maples recently published a collection of poems meant to give voice to these forgotten women.

Protesters Demand Justice for Man Killed by Hoover Police

Protesters gathered Saturday at the Riverchase Galleria to demand justice for the killing of E.J. Bradford, who was shot by police on Thanksgiving night. Police hours after the shooting said Bradford was the shooter who wounded two people, but later said he was likely not the gunman.

Galleria Mall Shooter Could be at Large

Hoover police issued a statement Friday night indicating the shooter who injured two people at the Riverchase Galleria mall in a shooting Thanksgiving night could be at large. Police shot and killed a 21-year-old Hueytown man who police say fled the scene of the shooting, but wasn’t likely the one who fired shots injuring two people at the mall on that busy shopping night.

New Birmingham Bar Owner Named National “Bartender of the Year”

Laura Newman was named the 2018 “Bartender of the Year” by the U.S. Bartenders Guild. She’s the first woman to earn the title, and she’s opening a new cocktail bar in downtown Birmingham called Queen’s Park.

Former Finance Exec to Lead Birmingham-Southern College

Birmingham-Southern College has named a new president to replace Linda Flaherty-Goldsmith, who retired earlier this fall. Officials approved the appointment in a meeting Thursday morning.

Some Alabama Voters Anxious Ahead of the Midterms

Groups such as the NAACP and the ACLU have closely monitored voting access. But voter roll purges and dozens of closed polling places in recent years have many Alabama voters worried ahead of Tuesday’s midterms. They fear they’ll encounter problems at the polls.

Former Birmingham Black Barons Pitcher Remembers ’48 Negro League World Series

This week marks the 70th anniversary of the Birmingham Black Barons’ appearance in what would become the last Negro League World Series ever played. The 1948 team was considered the greatest Black Barons team of all-time and was made up of legends like Bill Greason. Greason was a pitcher who broke the color barrier with the Oklahoma City Indians and later played briefly in the Major League. The 94-year-old tells WBHM’s Janae Pierre about that final Negro League World Series against the Washington Homestead Grays.

‘Rosies’ Featured at Vulcan for Museum Day

The Smithsonian Magazine has its 14th annual “Museum Day” this Saturday. That means free admission to thousands of museums around the country. Here in Birmingham, one participating museum—Vulcan Park & Museum—is putting a twist on the Smithsonian’s them: Women Making History. Casey Gamble is Vulcan’s museum coordinator. She tells WBHM’s Janae Pierre how they plan to incorporate Rosie the Riveter for this year’s event.

Birmingham Times Founder Recognized Among Black PR Pioneers

Alabama native, Jesse Lewis Sr. is recognized as a publishing and marketing trailblazer in the South. In the early 50s, Lewis founded the first minority-owned public relations firm in the U.S. His very first client was the Birmingham Coca Cola Bottling Company. With their support, Lewis founded the Birmingham Times in 1964. For most of his career, he focused on marketing to African American consumers, a demographic he says was completely ignored during that time. The 93 year old was recently recognized among Black PR Pioneers at the Museum of Public Relations in New York.

Marti Buckley: From Birmingham to Basque Country

When Marti Buckley was a student at LSU, she wanted to study abroad in Madrid. Instead, they placed her in San Sebastian – Spain’s Basque Country. She fell in love with the oceans, the mountains and the food. She moved back to Birmingham, her hometown, in 2006 and gave birth to her daughter two years later. Buckley tells WBHM’s Janae Pierre how she landed in Basque Country after working for Southern Living Magazine and cooking under one of the south’s most revered chefs.

New App Aims to Make Game Day Parking Easier

It’s football season which means tailgates and then … the game. But before fans even get to the stadium, they need to find parking, which can be dreadful. There have been several mobile apps developed around the country to help drivers find parking. WBHM’s Janae Pierre looks at one new mobile app here in Alabama meant to take some of the pain out of parking.

Birmingham Restaurant Week Sometimes A Deal

Birmingham Restaurant Week is in full swing. At several restaurants across the city, diners choose from a prix-fixe menu – that’s several courses at a fixed price. But with crowded restaurants and a limited menu … is it really worth it?

Dorothy Levy, Co-founder Of United Cerebral Palsy Of Birmingham, Celebrates 106th Birthday

Dorothy Levy celebrated her 106th birthday last month, but the party isn’t quite over. Levy co-founded United Cerebral Palsy of Greater Birmingham, which is now United Ability, and she is as witty and alert as anyone could hope to be at her age.

Sloss’ Summer Program Teaches Traditions of Metal Art

This summer, a dozen young people learned the techniques and traditions of metal art during Sloss’ Summer Youth Apprenticeship.

Sloss Fest Becomes Sensory Inclusive

The Sloss Music & Arts Festival is this weekend! Organizers recently announced this year’s event will be certified “sensory inclusive.” It’s meant to attract individuals with autism and other disabilities.