Federal COVID-19 Rent and Utilities Assistance Set For Birmingham Residents

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Ashley Brown, Flickr

The City of Birmingham has received nearly $6.3 million in federal funding to assist residents who are unable to pay rent and utilities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The funding comes as part of a $25 billion program from the U.S. Department of the Treasury, which began allocating money to states, territories, local governments and Indian tribes last month.

Funding for the Emergency Rental Assistance program was approved by the City Council during Tuesday’s regularly scheduled meeting. It was initially announced last month by Mayor Randall Woodfin, who said his administration had made the funding a “priority.”

“No one should be at a risk of losing their home or services due to economic hardships from COVID-19,” Woodfin said in a press release.

When the program becomes available, Birmingham renters will be able to apply as long as they meet the following criteria:

  • They qualify for unemployment or have experienced a reduction in household income, incurred significant costs, or experienced a financial hardship due to COVID-19;
  • They demonstrate a risk of experiencing homelessness or housing instability and;
  • They have a household income at or below 80% of the area median.

Applications to receive funding aren’t yet being accepted; an information line for the program can be reached at 205-250-7537, and the program has a page on the city’s website.

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