News

Elias Hendricks brings classical soul to Birmingham with Vox Fortura

Singer and Birmingham native Elias Hendricks has a career that has taken him all over the world. He'll perform with his classical soul group Vox Fortura Sunday at the Lyric Theatre.

Police remove suspicious backpack from near a Birmingham synagogue

Authorities said the bag was a credible threat although it did not contain an explosive. The incident came on the heels of threats against synagogues in New Jersey.

Birmingham hopes City Walk will bridge a divide between neighborhoods

Birmingham's City Walk is a linear, urban park that opened about five months ago under the Interstate 20/59 bridges. City officials say it's an attempt to reconnect downtown to the northern neighborhoods.

In New Orleans, a symbolic bike ride helps fight recidivism. Here’s how it impacted the riders.

The annual NOLA to Angola bike ride returned this month to help the nonprofit The First 72+ fight recidivism. Participants share what the ride means to them.

Outdoorsy Black Women helps change the face of outdoor activities

Outdoorsy Black Women is a national organization with more than 3,000 members across the country. The Birmingham chapter began in early 2022 and it already has 160 members. 

Auburn fires coach Bryan Harsin

Harsin went 9-12 overall and 3-5 this year. Auburn has lost four straight games while struggling against Power Five opponents. Auburn will owe more than $15 million and half of that must be paid within 30 days.

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Staying Pink: Jackson Women’s Health Organization is closed, but 1 group continues the fight

A small team of activists is still gathering outside of the Pink House — though the clinic has closed — to continue the fight for abortion access.

Outgoing Senator Shelby backs US recognition for state tribe

The MOWA Band of Choctaw Indians are still seeking federal recognition, and they're one of two state-recognized tribes hoping Congress will right what they see as wrongs of the past with the help of two influential U.S. senators who are retiring.

Tuberville: US has too many ‘takers’ who don’t want to work

Tuberville made the remarks, suggesting that many in younger generations — including people in their 40s — don't understand they need to work, while discussing the national worker shortage during a speech to business groups in south Alabama.

Will the Magic City Classic return to Legion Field next year?

With Legion Field nearly 100 years old and Protective Stadium opening last year in downtown Birmingham, people have questioned if the Magic City Classic will find a new home.

3 key reasons why ESPN chose Jackson State’s rivalry with Southern for College GameDay

An ESPN producer called JSU’s rise one of college football's biggest stories. Here are three key elements that make Saturday’s rivalry game worth highlighting.

Fed up with Jackson’s water system, this Mississippi suburb wants to create its own

Experts say merging water systems can help with the high cost of maintenance. But Byam, Mississippi — fed up with Jackson’s water crisis — wants to go it alone.

Childhood literacy program to expand after Birmingham approves funding

The $1 million will help Birmingham Talks, more than triple its reach to 3,500 students across all 99 neighborhoods over the next three years.

Racist wording is still in the Alabama Constitution. Voters can erase it

The Alabama Constitution of 1901 contains racist language regarding slavery, poll taxes, and school segregation. If approved by voters, a recompilation measure on the November 8, 2022 ballot will remove that language, as well as reorganize the constitution.

Here are the 10 statewide amendments voters will see on the ballot in November

From "Aniah's Law to economic development, the November 8 ballot will give Alabamians the opportunity to vote for 10 statewide amendments.

Slavery is on the ballot in Alabama and 4 other states

More than 150 years after slaves were freed in the U.S., voters in five states, including Alabama, will soon decide whether to close loopholes that led to the proliferation of a different form of slavery — forced labor by people convicted of certain crimes.

How one small town is teaching English to kids of immigrants

Russellville, with large numbers of Hispanic immigrants, is using federal COVID-19 relief money for an experiment to serve students who are still learning English. They are hiring and certifying more local, Spanish-speaking staff.

Martin Luther King’s 1963 Birmingham arrest spurred a Supreme Court case. The ruling still matters

The case is Walker v. City of Birmingham, which ruled on the legal principles that allowed Bull Conner and Birmingham to jail Martin Luther King Jr. on Good Friday, 1963. Harvard law professor Randall Kennedy explains why the case continues to impact legal thinking during these tumultuous times.

Judge dismisses lawsuit over upcoming lethal injection in Alabama

The judge on Sunday granted Alabama's request to dismiss the lawsuit brought by Kenneth Eugene Smith, agreeing that Smith waited too long to file the challenge. But the judge also warned Alabama's prison commissioner to strictly follow established protocol when officials attempt to put Smith to death next month.

Why now is the right time for Alabama to honor Hugo Black’s complicated legacy

Alabama native and Supreme Court justice Hugo Black became a civil rights champion after a brief time in the KKK. A new monument honors his complicated legacy.

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Birmingham’s status as a minor league sports hub gets a major boost from the New Orleans Pelicans

Friday night isn’t just any old preseason game for the New Orleans Pelicans. It’s also a pivotal moment for Birmingham in its quest to be a sports town.

Black leaders rebuke Tuberville stance on reparations, crime

Tuberville told people Saturday at an election rally in Nevada that Democrats support reparations for the descendants of enslaved people because “they think the people that do the crime are owed that.”

DOJ finds Alabama’s foster care system violates law

The U.S. Department of Justice said the state's foster care program has illegally placed hundreds of students with disabilities into “segregated and inferior educational programs,” a direct violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

New aviation charter school aims to diversify the cockpit

Since the pandemic began, the aviation industry is down two-million workers and those who remain are overwhelmingly white. One new charter school in Bessemer hopes to address both issues by preparing diverse students for jobs in aviation.

Despite pushback, the organizers of Cullman’s first pride event are pushing forward

The announcement of Saturday’s event drew threats and calls for counter-protests. In response, LGBTQ+ communities across the state have offered their support.

6 ways the conversation around a guaranteed income in the US has changed

A guaranteed income conference held in Atlanta shows how the movement has progressed since 2017, with more than 50 pilots currently handing out cash.

New mental health crisis center aims to interrupt revolving door of jail and ER visits

The new clinic in Jefferson County will offer short-term crisis care to people who might otherwise wait hours at a hospital or wind up in jail.

Mississippi’s latest move in its anti-abortion agenda? A tax break for corporate donations

Tax documents show energy company foundations financed the anti-abortion movement in the Gulf South for years. Now, they could get a tax break for that support.

Birmingham City Council moves toward approval of cannabis dispensaries

Birmingham has taken “the first step” on the road to legalizing medical marijuana. The City Council voted Tuesday to approve an ordinance authorizing medical cannabis dispensaries to operate within Birmingham city limits.

The landmark Voting Rights Act faces further dismantling in case from Alabama

The law is once again on the chopping block ­— this time on the question of how state legislatures may draw congressional district lines when the state's voters are racially polarized.

Gulf States rank at the bottom for climate-adapted housing. Organizers want to change that.

As natural disasters and extreme weather become more frequent in the Gulf South, a new report hopes to be a road map to providing more climate-adapted housing.

How Dr. Emily Fortney is using her clinical psychology work to help pregnant people

Suicide is a leading cause of death in women, and mood and anxiety disorders make perinatal risks more complicated. Dr. Fortney’s work is focused on this issue.